Supreme Court of India
File photo | The Supreme Court of India | Manisha Mondal/ThePrint
Text Size:

New Delhi: The Supreme Court asked the Karnataka Assembly Speaker on Friday to maintain status quo on the resignation and disqualification of 10 rebel Congress and JD(S) MLAs.

A bench headed by Chief Justice Ranjan Gogoi posted the matter pertaining to the Karnataka political crisis for further hearing on 16 July.

The bench, also comprising justices Deepak Gupta and Aniruddha Bose, specifically mentioned in the order that Karnataka Assembly Speaker K R Ramesh Kumar would neither decide the issue of resignation nor that of the disqualification of the rebel MLAs to enable the court to decide the larger issues raised during the hearing of the matter.

The bench noted in its order that the issue of maintainability of the rebel MLAs’ petition under Article 32 of the Constitution was raised by the Speaker and Karnataka Chief Minister H D Kumaraswamy.

Further, the bench noted that senior advocate Mukul Rohatgi, appearing for the rebel MLAs, had countered the Speaker’s submission that the disqualification plea of the ruling coalition in the southern state had to be decided before taking up the issue of resignation of the lawmakers.

The bench said taking all these aspects and the incomplete facts before it into consideration, there was a need for further hearing.

“In view of the weighty issue that have arisen, we are of the view that the matter be considered by us on Tuesday. We are of the view that the status quo as of today with regard to the prevailing situation be maintained. Neither the issue of resignation nor that of disqualification be decided till Tuesday,” the bench said.

We are deeply grateful to our readers & viewers for their time, trust and subscriptions.

Quality journalism is expensive and needs readers to pay for it. Your support will define our work and ThePrint’s future.

SUBSCRIBE NOW


Also read: As more Karnataka MLAs resign, do defectors win elections? Data holds the answer


On challenging SC’s order

The apex court also asked whether the Speaker had the power to challenge its order. It was hearing a plea moved by Speaker K R Ramesh Kumar against its Thursday order asking him to take a decision on the resignation of 10 rebel MLAs on Thursday.

The MLAs told the bench on Friday that the Speaker had not taken any decision on their move to step down, adding that he had no immunity with regard to the acceptance of the resignations.

However, the counsel appearing for the Karnataka Assembly Speaker said he was constitutionally obligated to decide on a plea for disqualification of the rebel MLAs.


Also read: What an Indian law can do to MLAs defecting in Karnataka & Goa – nothing


 

Subscribe to our channels on YouTube & Telegram

News media is in a crisis & only you can fix it

You are reading this because you value good, intelligent and objective journalism. We thank you for your time and your trust.

You also know that the news media is facing an unprecedented crisis. It is likely that you are also hearing of the brutal layoffs and pay-cuts hitting the industry. There are many reasons why the media’s economics is broken. But a big one is that good people are not yet paying enough for good journalism.

We have a newsroom filled with talented young reporters. We also have the country’s most robust editing and fact-checking team, finest news photographers and video professionals. We are building India’s most ambitious and energetic news platform. And we aren’t even three yet.

At ThePrint, we invest in quality journalists. We pay them fairly and on time even in this difficult period. As you may have noticed, we do not flinch from spending whatever it takes to make sure our reporters reach where the story is. Our stellar coronavirus coverage is a good example. You can check some of it here.

This comes with a sizable cost. For us to continue bringing quality journalism, we need readers like you to pay for it. Because the advertising market is broken too.

If you think we deserve your support, do join us in this endeavour to strengthen fair, free, courageous, and questioning journalism, please click on the link below. Your support will define our journalism, and ThePrint’s future. It will take just a few seconds of your time.

Support Our Journalism

2 Comments Share Your Views

2 COMMENTS

  1. It is possible for a lay person to come to a completely different conclusion than the direction in which the apex court appears to be moving. The separation of powers between legislature and the judiciary is being mangled. With great respect, the Court cannot substitute its wisdom and understanding of the law for exercise of powers that inherent in the post of Speaker.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here