Prime Minister Narendra Modi with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. This is the fifth meeting between the two leaders this year | Photo: Praveen Jain | ThePrint
Prime Minister Narendra Modi with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. This is the fifth meeting between the two leaders this year | Photo: Praveen Jain | ThePrint
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New Delhi: The current situation in Kashmir is “not sustainable” and needs to change for sure, German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Friday told German media ahead of her ‘restricted meeting’ with Prime Minister Narendra Modi and after co-chairing the fifth Inter-Governmental Consultations (IGC) with him.

However, the Kashmir situation was not discussed during the IGC and as per sources, Merkel expected to hear from Prime Minister Modi plans for Jammu and Kashmir during their ‘restricted meeting’

“As the situation at this moment (in Kashmir) is not sustainable and not good, this has to change for sure,” Merkel was quoted as having said by German sources.

The comments by the German Chancellor come amidst concerns expressed by some foreign lawmakers, including from the US, over restrictions imposed by the government post abrogation of Article 370 to withdraw Jammu and Kashmir’s special status in August.

After their extensive delegation-level talks, the two leaders held a ‘restricted meeting’ at the official residence of the Prime Minister in the presence of select ministers and officials from both the sides.

Among others present at the meeting included External Affairs Minister S Jaishankar, National Security Advisor Ajit Doval and Foreign Secretary Vijay Gokhale from the Indian side.


Also read: Modi, Merkel ink pact for India-Germany cooperation in skill development


 

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1 COMMENT

  1. Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks for both Germany and the EU. The official narrative is not being received well globally. 2. The visit of AfD MEPs would have angered the German government. 3. Unfair to blame our diplomats, since their advice may not be cutting ice.

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