Image from Woolahtea.com
Image from Woolahtea.com
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New Delhi: Upamanyu Borkakoty and Anshuman Bharali from Assam have come up with one-of-its-kind dip tea ‘bags’ that are made of two whole compressed leaves and a bud.

It is shaped in a cylindrical form and tied with a naturally-grown cotton string. All one has to do is put it in boiling water. The leaves unfurl in four-five minutes and the tea is ready.

The duo, who own the The Tea Leaf Theory, have launched these tea bags under their brand Wooláh. Labelled Truedips, the tea bags weigh around 2 grams and can brew up to four cups per dip.

“The women pluck teas from farms, compress it, and pack it. From here, it goes directly to the customer. This increases the shelf life of the leaves, as moisture does not seep in during multiple transportations,” Borkakoty told Better India while explaining how their entire process is completed in one place.


Also read: Rare tea variety from Assam fetches record Rs 75,000 per kg at auction


12 rappers from 8 states come together to ‘capture perspectives’ of Northeast

As many as 12 rappers from the eight Northeastern states have come together to create a music video titled ‘Northeast Cypher 2020’.

Rap artist K4Kekho from Arunachal Pradesh was quoted saying that the intention was to “capture situations and perspectives about the Northeast from people of different backgrounds”.

“When it comes to hip-hop, Northeast has always been an active participant since the very beginning. Yet, the nation never talks about the scene much. Maybe it is because of the lack of relatable content and emotional connection since the culture we represent is different from the rest of the country,” K4Kekho said.

Each artist individually recorded their music video which was then compiled by a Meghalaya-based music producer.

Two other rappers, Samir Rishu Mohanty aka Big Deal along with Zonunmawia Fanai, who goes by the stage name G’nie, also released a song last week called ‘I’m a chinkey’ to address racism against people with Mongoloid features.

Dimapur’s ‘Santa police’ bring cheer to the homeless

This Christmas, the Dimapur Police in Nagaland were on a mission to bring some festive cheer and warmth to the homeless. The personnel were out on the streets at 6.30 am Friday to serve hot coffee and snacks to people living on the streets.

The police received widespread praise for their act of kindness in the hilly town.

Officer-in-Charge of East Police station, R.K. Patton was quoted saying that this was done to bring back the festive spirit to the town.

Migrant labourers turn 100-acre unused land into mustard field

A group of 20 migrant labourers from Assam’s Mishing tribe, along with 30 others, have turned over 100 acres of unused land into a sprawling mustard field during lockdown.

The mustard cultivation lies beside the Brahmaputra river in Majuli. The labourers were among those who had returned to their hometowns from cities during the Covid-19 lockdown.

“I worked for about a year in Kottayam, but the pandemic forced me to return home. Worried over the job loss, I contacted some locals of Sukansuti and Chataipur villages who came out with the brilliant idea,” said Dipankar Kutum, one of the labourers who worked on the project.

“The work started in September with the support of villagers. We don’t have a market here, but we believe we would get in excess of Rs 50 lakh by selling the produce,” he added.


Also read: In Nagaland, mystery ‘Miss Santa’ leaves Christmas gifts, some love & a reminder to mask up


 

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