Biharika at Bihar Niwas is an initiative of the Bihar government to help artisans recover from the impact of the pandemic | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Biharika at Bihar Niwas is an initiative of the Bihar government to help artisans recover from the impact of the pandemic | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
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New Delhi: From Madhubani tea sets to exotic coasters with Tikuli work — a new store at New Delhi’s Bihar Niwas seeks to bring some of the state’s most striking artforms to your home while helping artisans recover from the blow of the pandemic.

‘Biharika, Bihar Ki Kala Dehri’, an initiative of the Bihar government, is an exhibit store that was inaugurated Friday. Interested buyers can purchase (if in stock) or book items from the store and make payments directly to the bank or UPI accounts of the artisans who made them.

Payments are digitised, and there is no added cost — GST or profit margin for the store — to the products.

The goods on offer include coasters, bags, embroidered sarees, tea sets, masks, and wall hangings, among other things. They have been fashioned in the style of artforms like Manjusha, Madhubani, Sikki, Tikuli, Sujani, papier mache, Bawan Booti, and Obra.

Currently, there are more than 20 artists attached to the initiative, and they decide the prices for their products.

Statue of lord Ganesha at Biharika | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Statue of Lord Ganesha at Biharika | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Paper mesi elephant by Prafull Kumar Lal | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Papier mache elephant | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
The store has been opened during the festive season in hope of getting more business |Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
The store has been launched during the festive season in the hope of better business | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
There are painted teapot set at the store | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
A Madhubani tea set | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Anyone can place an order at the store, and will be directly connected to the artist |Photo: Manisha Mondal | TePrint
Buyers can make direct payments to the artisans |Photo: Manisha Mondal | TePrint
There are products from Madhubani, Tikuli, Sujni and more art forms |Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
The products on offer are drawn from artforms like Madhubani, Sikki, and Sujani | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Magazine holders at the store | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Magazine holders at the store | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint

The initiative started taking shape last year after the Covid lockdown, to help the artisans who suffered a setback on account of the sudden halt to earnings.

Prafulla Kumar Lal, a Muzaffarpur-based artist specialising in Madhubani, has showcased papier mache products at the store. Lal, who has been in this profession with his wife for 15 years, said the lockdown left their house stacked with unsold products. During the lockdown, he told ThePrint, there was nothing to eat and they have not been able to pay the rent for a year now.

Coaster sets with Sujni art | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Coaster sets with Tikuli work | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Sujni art at display |Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Madhubani art on display | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint

“I have exhibited my products at Biharika with the hope that it will help recover the losses we suffered due to the lockdown,” he said. “Biharika ek doobte hue ko tinke ka sahara hai (Biharika is our last resort).

Soni Kumari from Patna who practises Tikuli said she has already received a few orders from the shop. “Thoda time dena hoga, toh bada order bhi ayega (Give it time, bigger orders will follow).”

Sarees are also at display at the store | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Sarees are among the goods sold at Biharika | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint

 

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