Wednesday, 5 October, 2022
TopicFamily businesses

Topic: family businesses

Hinduja family feud puts their century-old business empire in jeopardy

The increasingly bitter feud has raised the possibility of a messy unraveling of the $18 bn British-Indian group, which employs over 150,000 people in 38 nations.

Is there life after family business? Fourth-generation Baidyanath owner offers lessons

In 'How to Thrive in a Family Business: Business Lessons from my Baidyanath Journey', businessman Ajay Sharma narrates his experiences and learning.

Something nearly tore Mariwala family apart. Timely IPO saved it from hostile takeover

In 'Harsh Realities: The Making of Marico' entrepreneur Harsh Mariwala and management expert Ram Charan zoom in on the journey of the company - from its establishment in 1987 - to becoming a leading international FMCG giant.

‘The Consolidators’ book review: Entrepreneurs who turned their silver spoons gold

Author Prince Mathews Thomas narrates stories of successful second-generation entrepreneurs who grew the family businesses they inherited.

On Camera

YourTurn

File photo of Pakistan's Finance Minister Ishaq Dar | Reuters

Ishaq Dar, new Pakistan finance minister—a Nawaz Sharif’s mole in Shehbaz Sharif’s cabinet

Insanity is doing the same thing and expecting different results, Albert Einstein said. But Paksitanis don't get it--Dar's been appointed FM for the fifth time.
Beneficiaries of the PM-GKAY PDS centre in Odisha | Representational image | ANI

Free grains, fuel tax deferred – Gujarat, HP on its mind, Modi govt puts politics over economy

RBI's rate hike also among decisions announced last week that might pay political dividends in state polls, but could come with commensurate economic costs, say economists.

Defence

IAF chief Air Chief Marshal V. R. Chaudhari with Defence Minister Rajnath Singh | Twitter/ @IAF_MCC

Need organisation structure best suited to Indian conditions, IAF on theatre commands

The IAF chief said the model of integration that India adopts must be future-ready, must reduce levels of decision-making, and capitalise on the strength of all three services.

India’s hijab supporters will lose even if they win SC battle. Because the real war is political

In a highly polarised time, cornered minorities tend to lean back and protect the roots and fundamentals of what is so dear to them. Politically, it can often be a bad trap.
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