Two women, both named Nanhi Devi, are the bread winners in their families. Nanhi Devi (right) lost her husband and in-laws to TB, while the other woman's husband is too old and rests at home | Jyoti Yadav | ThePrint
Two women, both named Nanhi Devi, are the bread winners in their families. Nanhi Devi (right) lost her husband and in-laws to TB, while the other woman's husband is too old and rests at home | Jyoti Yadav | ThePrint
Text Size:

Bilpur, Uttar Pradesh: Among the hundreds of migrants who walked, cycled and/or managed to board state government buses back to their villages, some of them have returned to work on fields.

ThePrint, which has been travelling to states to track the developing Covid-19 story, came across some of them labouring on farms in Uttar Pradesh.

Most of the migrants were from UP and Bihar.

The farm work has been commissioned under a MGNREGA scheme by the village and block administration to ensure the workers can at least manage their daily meals at a time the country’s, and even the world’s, economies have stalled.

ThePrint met these workers at Bilpur village, located at the border of Shahjahanpur and Bareilly districts, who spoke about their experience during the lockdown.

After reaching home in late March, the workers had quarantined themselves for 14 days and then started working on farmlands | Photo: Jyoti Yadav | ThePrint
Workers take a break from tilling the land. They had managed to reach home in late March, after which they quarantined themselves for 14 days before starting work on the farms | Jyoti Yadav | ThePrint
Around 110 workers are on fields near Chakroad | Photo: Jyoti Yadav | ThePrint
Around 110 labourers works the fields near Chakroad, including a 10-years-old | Jyoti Yadav | ThePrint
The migrant workers have walked hundreds of kilometers. But they still have to work so that they can feed their family | Photo: Jyoti Yadav | ThePrint
The journey to these farms has included the hundred of kilometres the migrants walked from cities such as Delhi and Mumbai. Back home, they now struggle to feed their families | Jyoti Yadav | ThePrint
On the fields there are bottles of sanitisers and special attention is given to social distancing | Photo: Jyoti Yadav | ThePrint
To ensure there no outbreak, hand sanitisers have been provided while labourers follow social distancing | Jyoti Yadav | ThePrint
Ram kumar, 35 years old labourer from Bilpur village, says that hardships are the predominant factor in his life but the only thing that stays constant and never leaves his side is his cycle | Photo: Jyoti Yadav | ThePrint
For Ram Kumar, a 35-years-old labourer from Bilpur, these hardships are just another struggle he needs to overcome. Through it all, his trusty cycle has been his companion | Jyoti Yadav | ThePrint

Subscribe to our channels on YouTube & Telegram

Why news media is in crisis & How you can fix it

India needs free, fair, non-hyphenated and questioning journalism even more as it faces multiple crises.

But the news media is in a crisis of its own. There have been brutal layoffs and pay-cuts. The best of journalism is shrinking, yielding to crude prime-time spectacle.

ThePrint has the finest young reporters, columnists and editors working for it. Sustaining journalism of this quality needs smart and thinking people like you to pay for it. Whether you live in India or overseas, you can do it here.

Support Our Journalism

3 Comments Share Your Views

3 COMMENTS

  1. Why UP and Bihar CM can’t provide decent to their ppl in their own States ? Why do their ppl hv to go to other States to fend for themselves ? Why only nautanki, jumlabaazi Hindu Muslim, fake Nationalism ? Disgusting and pathetic.

    • Your comment is awaiting Moderation”? On a Blessing? Where are you guys coming from in terms of logic?

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here