Chandrayaan-2 captures images of the lunar surface with it Terrain Mapping Camera-2 (TMC-2) on 23 August at an altitude of about 4,375 km. The photo shows craters including Jackson, Mach, Korolev and Mitra | ISRO
Chandrayaan-2 captures images of the lunar surface with it Terrain Mapping Camera-2 (TMC-2) on 23 August at an altitude of about 4,375 km. The photo shows craters including Jackson, Mach, Korolev and Mitra | ISRO
Text Size:

Bengaluru: Chandrayaan-2, which is currently orbiting the Moon, has captured some more images of the lunar surface showing several craters, the Indian Space Research Organisation said on Monday

Sharing the pictures, the ISRO said in a statement that the photos captured by the lunar spacecraft are those of craters Somerfeld, Kirkwood, Jackson, Mach, Korolev, Mitra, Plaskett, Rozhdestvenskiy and Hermite.

These craters have been named after great scientists, astronomers and physicists.

Crater Mitra has been named after Prof Sisir Kumar Mitra, an Indian physicist and Padma Bhushan recipient known for his pioneering work in the field of ionosphere and Radiophysics.


Also read: ISRO releases first picture of Moon captured by Chandrayaan-2


The space agency said these pictures of the lunar surface were taken on August 23 by the Terrain Mapping Camera-2 of Chandrayaan-2 from an altitude of about 4,375 km.

The first picture of Moon captured by Chandrayaan-2 was released by ISRO on August 22.

Chandrayaan-2, a three-module spacecraft comprising an orbiter, lander and rover, was launched on July 22.

ISRO had on August 21 performed second lunar bound orbit manoeuvre for Chandrayaan-2 and said all spacecraft parameters are normal.

There will be three more orbit manoeuvres before the lander’s separation from the Orbiter on September 2 and eventual soft landing in the south polar region of the Moon, planned on September 7.


Also read: In Pictures: ISRO releases images of Earth taken by Chandrayaan 2


 

Subscribe to our channels on YouTube & Telegram

Why news media is in crisis & How you can fix it

India needs free, fair, non-hyphenated and questioning journalism even more as it faces multiple crises.

But the news media is in a crisis of its own. There have been brutal layoffs and pay-cuts. The best of journalism is shrinking, yielding to crude prime-time spectacle.

ThePrint has the finest young reporters, columnists and editors working for it. Sustaining journalism of this quality needs smart and thinking people like you to pay for it. Whether you live in India or overseas, you can do it here.

Support Our Journalism

Share Your Views

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here