Monday, 15 August, 2022
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Before going to anti-CAA agitation, a protest begins at home — against parents

When the majoritarian view clashes with your own opinion and your parents aren’t listening either, what can you do?

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During the recent anti-CAA protests, I came across a picture of a woman carrying a poster that read: ‘It’s so bad that even my mom is here’. However, every young rebel feeling agitated over the current socio-political situation in Narendra Modi’s India might not be this lucky. Among other things, how to convince parents to let the children go to protests or deal with the ideological differences, has become an essential part of millennial conversations. A woman in Bengaluru was disowned by her father and later arrested for shouting slogans during a rally. The father of 19-year-old Amulya Leona was later quoted saying that he had advised her not to criticise Prime Minister Modi and Union Home Minister Amit Shah for CAA, and that she had “gone out of control”.

This isn’t the first time. When the students’ protests first started, Uttar Pradesh Police asked parents to counsel their children not to come.

Not just your mom and dad, the Indian police, the state, all want to treat the young as juvenile and act as parents — “sab mile hue hai ji,” as a great thinker once said.


Also read: Student who shouted ‘Pakistan Zindabad’ on Owaisi stage had praised Modi hours before


How parents think they own our lives

Indian parents have been making choices for their children since time immemorial. From what to eat, what to study, whether to keep a pet or not, whom to marry, parents love making decisions on behalf of their children. The anti-CAA protests have made one thing clear — the choices parents make for their children aren’t limited to the above-mentioned matters. Many of my opinionated friends who have an anti-establishment view and are not happy with the Modi government’s policy on various issues, face the wrath of their family quite often. This further leads to frustration, forcing them to keep away from family gatherings where they might find a distant uncle boasting about how all the Bangladeshis and Muslims will now be dragged out of India.

This also gives birth to a feeling of dissociation and abandonment. When the majoritarian view clashes with your own opinion and your parents aren’t listening either, what can you do? It becomes a battle being fought on multiple fronts. One of my friends, who has been a regular visitor to the anti-CAA protests, told me about how she had to do a ‘bhookh-hartaal’ in her own house when she was grounded for participating in the protests.


Also read: Have lost one eye, not resolve: Jamia student who won best paper after police lathi-charge


How ideology divides family

This isolation forces us to think about the cause behind these ideological clashes. It isn’t necessary that the parents who are disowning their children’s ideological opinion must have some clarity over their own. Dissent has become dangerous to an extent that even showing anti-CAA slogans painted on a bedsheet from a distant balcony becomes a reason for the eviction of two young women from their rented apartment in Delhi.

Parents think that whatever they do is for their children’s safety. There is a popular saying, ‘Sab chahte hain Bhagat Singh paida ho, par padosi ke ghar mein’ (everyone wants Bhagat Singh to be born, but in the neighbour’s house). Deep down, even if they know what the children are doing might be correct, they think their children standing up might harm them or ruin their careers.

Fear has done no good to anyone. Morality comes from being fearless. It’s time parents stopped dictating their children’s life, opinions, and decisions, and learn to accept how times have changed.

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6 COMMENTS

  1. The girl’s facebook post said All countries Zindabad and in that order from india to nepal , sri lanka etc. She also said Hindustan Zindabad 6 times after she said pakistan zindabad. She was not allowed to complete her speech, most probabaly she would have said something promoting harmony among nations .

  2. The girl’s facebook post said All countries Zindabad and in that order from india to nepal , sri lanka etc. She also said Hindustan Zindabad 6 times after she said pakistan zindabad. She was not allowed to complete her speech, most probabaly she would have said something promoting harmony among nations .

  3. 1. If Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA) has made citizens think about their rights, it is certainly a good development. 2. Ideally CAA should be debated in as many forums as possible but that does not seem to happen as both sides are reluctant to concede that the other side has a view too. 2. Our Constitution is not something about which only experts should discuss. Its provisions have to be explained to ordinary citizens in a lucid, proper manner. However, my observation is that leaders of our political parties are more interested in interpreting provisions of the Constitution as per their own convenience. Hence my question is this: have ordinary citizens been made aware of consequences of CAA in an unbiased manner? Answer to this is unfortunately NO. This is happening because there are two opposing views on CAA and even experts are taking political positions to oppose or support CAA. It is also my observation that finding fault with all political decisions of NDA is of little use. 3. As regards protests against CAA by the young students, it is perfectly okay provided these students are told about both views and provided they are not brainwashed. 4. I think in this context we should refer to protest by Bengaluru student Amulya Leona. Her lack of maturity can be understood; however, I simply fail to understand her love for Pakistan. 5. We all know that as a country which became independent in 1947, Pakistan is a failure in every respect. Of course, if one wishes to consider Pakistan with just one factor in mind- that of culture of Islamic fundamentalism which exists in Pakistan today- Pakistan may get some six or seven marks out of ten. 4. Youngsters like this Amulya need not be banned from getting involved in political protests, but they need a word of caution too.

  4. The Left does not mind using children and women to advance their lost causes, even to the detriment of the family structure. Beware.

  5. While referring to sloganeer girl in Bengaluru, you failed to mention that it was not just an anti-CAA slogan, but pro-Pakistani slogan “Pakistan Zindabad”. This is not intellectual freedom, but its abuse. You are also guilty of withholding disclosure of such despicable acts. We want our country to survive and thrive, not the other country which wishes our destruction.

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