Here lab technicians in the screening centre at the Kiranshree Grand Hotel take a breather. The centre has been screening about 500 passengers daily.| Photo: Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Lab technicians in the screening centre at the Kiranshree Grand Hotel in Guwahati take a breather. The centre has been screening about 500 passengers daily | Photo: Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
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Guwahati: Last month, the Assam government launched a massive screening exercise to prevent Covid-19 from spreading through those coming into the state by air, rail or road. As of 18 June, the state had screened 2,90,625‬ people, barring passengers coming in from Sikkim via road.

When someone comes into the state, they are thoroughly screened, their temperature is checked, they are asked if they’re suffering from any Covid-19 symptoms and their swabs are collected.

They are then sent to hotels to be quarantined until their test results return. If they test negative for coronavirus, they have to spend 11 days in compulsory home quarantine. Those who test positive are sent to hospitals.

ThePrint’s journalist Angana Chakrabarti followed the screening process right from the railway station to one of the zonal screening facilities that has been set up at Kiranshree Grand Hotel to see what happens.

The screening process starts early on, as soon as passengers arrive at the airport and railway stations. A surveillance workers at Guwahati Railway Station checks their temperature and allows them to pass through only if it is below 96 degrees | Photo: Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
A surveillance worker at Guwahati Railway Station checks the body temperature of a policeman. Only those with a body temperature below 96 degrees Celsius are allowed to pass through | Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Passengers coming in via flights, are taken to the screening centres like this one at Kiranshree Grand Hotel. They are then asked to fill out forms with their details including their house addresses and comorbidities.| Photo: Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Passengers coming in on flights are taken to screening centres like this one at Kiranshree Grand Hotel. They are then asked to fill out forms with their details, including their residential address and comorbidities, if any | Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Lab technicians collect swabs from passengers at the zonal screening centre setup at Kiranshree Grand Hotel near the Guwahati airport. | Photo: Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Lab technicians collect swabs from passengers at the zonal screening centre set up at Kiranshree Grand Hotel near the Guwahati airport | Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Scores of policemen at Guwahati Railway Station, ensure that social distancing is maintained between passengers while officials gather their details. They are then sent off to one of the five zonal screening facilities setup across the state. | Photo: Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Policemen have been deployed at Guwahati Railway Station to ensure that social distancing is maintained between passengers while officials gather their details. Passengers are then sent to one of five zonal screening facilities set up across the state | Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
There are testing centres at airport, railway station and other points | Photo: Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Assam has adopted a strict screening and testing policy after the interstate travel restrictions were lifted. There are testing centres at the airport, railway station and other points | Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint

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