Chairman of the Central Board of Film Certification, Prasoon Joshi | Ravi Choudhary | PTI
Chairman of the Central Board of Film Certification, Prasoon Joshi | Ravi Choudhary | PTI
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Mumbai: CBFC chairman Prasoon Joshi on Thursday rubbished reports that the board had asked the makers of Hollywood movie “Ford v Ferrari” to blur the sequences with alcohol in the film, calling the media reports “false news”.

The Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) head clarified the blurring of shots was done “voluntarily by the makers” of the sports drama and had nothing to do with the body.

“Ford v Ferrari”, starring Christian Bale and Matt Damon, hit the Indian screens on November 15. The film revolves around the feud between Henry Ford II and Enzo Ferrari as they both competed to win Le Mans World Championship in France in 1966.

Reports last week claimed the CBFC had asked the makers to blur out images of liquor bottles and glasses with alcohol.

“This is to clarify once and for all that CBFC never asked the makers of ‘Ford v Ferrari’ to blur any shots in the film. I am disappointed with those who propagated false news that CBFC has asked for blurring shots in ‘Ford v Ferrari’,” Joshi said in a statement on Thursday.

He added, unfortunately such reports reflect on such “motivated people” who make attempts to “circulate news without verifying it”.

“The blurring was done voluntarily by the makers and has nothing to do with CBFC,” Joshi reiterated.

Though the CBFC didn’t ask the makers to blur the alcohol content, it did ask that four expletives be “muted or replaced” as well as an addition of anti-tobacco disclaimer.


Also read: Fakiri to sarkari: How Coke-ad maker Prasoon Joshi became Modi’s poet of choice in New India


 

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