At the Humayun's Tomb children play in the garden | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Children playing in the garden at the Humayun's Tomb | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Text Size:

New Delhi: Monuments in Delhi reopened to visitors Monday, the first time since the nationwide lockdown was imposed in March to contain the spread of Covid-19.

The Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) had closed more than 3,400 monuments on 17 March, days before the lockdown was enforced in India.

While Humayun’s Tomb, Qutub Minar and Safdarjung Tomb were among the monuments under ASI that opened its doors to visitors, one of Delhi’s major attractions — the Red Fort — still remained closed.

Visitors have been allowed to enter the monuments from 6 am to 6 pm. Body temperatures were recorded at the entry points and circles marked to ensure social distancing as people queued up to enter the monuments.

There were, however, only few visitors on the first day. ThePrint’s photojournalists Suraj Singh Bisht and Manisha Mondal capture some moments.

At Feroz Shah Kotla, people offer prayer | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
People offering prayers at the Feroz Shah Kotla | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Only few people visited the Humayun Tomb today | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
There were only a few visitors at the Humayun’s Tomb Monday | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
A worker sweeps the floor at Safdarjung Tomb | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
A worker sweeps the floor at the Safdarjung Tomb | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
At all monuments temperature is checked at the entry gate | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Visitors were made to undergo temperature checks at all monuments | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
A father son duo click a picture at Qutub Minar | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
A father-son duo taking a selfie at the Qutub Minar | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
A couple click picture at Qutub Minar | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
A couple clicking pictures at the Qutub Minar | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Workers at Humayun Tomb clean the rain water logged in one of the fountains | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
Workers at the Humayun Tomb clear rainwater from one of its fountains | Photo: Manisha Mondal | ThePrint
A security person walk past the Qutub Minar | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
A security person walks past the Qutub Minar | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint

Subscribe to our channels on YouTube & Telegram

Why news media is in crisis & How you can fix it

India needs free, fair, non-hyphenated and questioning journalism even more as it faces multiple crises.

But the news media is in a crisis of its own. There have been brutal layoffs and pay-cuts. The best of journalism is shrinking, yielding to crude prime-time spectacle.

ThePrint has the finest young reporters, columnists and editors working for it. Sustaining journalism of this quality needs smart and thinking people like you to pay for it. Whether you live in India or overseas, you can do it here.

Support Our Journalism

VIEW COMMENTS

2 COMMENTS

Comments are closed.