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The Indian cricket board deserves praise for sticking its neck out and denying an annual contract to former captain M.S. Dhoni. The wicketkeeper-batsman is past his prime and has, sadly, outstayed his welcome. Not getting an annual contract is a clear hint. He should take it and hang his gloves.

GST, CAA, now NIA — Centre-state trust deficit won’t let Modi’s federalism mantra work

Opposition-ruled states are increasingly on a collision course with the Centre over CAA, NPR, NRC, NIA, after GST. PM Narendra Modi’s political mantra of cooperative and competitive federalism will remain a non-starter if Centre-state trust deficit persists and widens. The onus is now on the Centre to reverse this trend.

Garg’s fiscal deficit statement dents India’s data credibility, Modi must ensure transparency

Former finance secretary Subhash Chandra Garg has confirmed suspicion that Modi government has been understating India’s fiscal deficit. This is a new, serious blow to the credibility of India’s data because Garg is someone who was in the system. Budget 2020 should admit this fudge and commit unambiguously to transparency.

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6 Comments Share Your Views

6 COMMENTS

  1. It is disappointing to see Modi going back on his slogans and pithy visionary terms – both economic and social. I think Shekhar Gupta should do a ‘Walk The Talk’ with him and ask him what happened to ‘cooperative federalism’, ‘sabka vishwas’, ‘make in India’ etc etc etc. On a personal level he should also be asked an impromptu question about how Modi rates his own performance, and what is the reason for whatever score he gives himself. There is a feeling that the steering has been passed on to the other guy in Term 2.0.

    • I have always believed the government should have appointed a first rate Media Advisor, dealt very differently with the media. No one likes to hear a word of criticism, true, but cloying sycophancy has prevented so many mid course corrections being made in good time.

      • It is pompous centralisation in contrast to the committee based governance of the previous regime, both with their own flaws. However, the goalpost has been shifted at regular intervals and there seems to be a fatigue, partially arising from over-campaigning and running thin on governance rather than consolidating gains worth showcasing on a few critical areas. There is a need for course correction.

  2. Setting the goal of making the lotus bloom in each pond between Kashmir and Kanyakumari has led to a style of politics and governance that has actually halved its geographical spread in the space of a couple of years. An inability to let a small city state function as per its own genius was an early indication that legitimate space would not be conceded to the opposition. With responsibilities and subjects clearly demarcated between Centre and states, the expectation always is that the interstices will be filled in through sagacity and statesmanship. CAA, NRC even more so, is something where the states will not timorously fall in line. State governments sense the mood of the people on the ground, will fashion their responses accordingly. Being obdurate will melt the promise of the mandate.

  3. Gentleman was the author of the previous Budget. The golden opportunity to present the first Budget of the second term, laying out a blueprint for economic revival was lost in favour of a stump speech. As far as the fiscal deficit is concerned, what the government – including its subsidiary entities – borrows is known to all. Anyway, good that an authentic picture has emerged from a responsible functionary. 2. There is speculation of a new FM. However, unless the underlying malaise is dealt with, that could prove to be a cosmetic change.

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