Residents of a remote area of Dhubri, a district in Assam, travel on boats to reach their houses. The flooded areas through which the boats traverse are paddy fields | Yimkumla Longkumer | ThePrint
Residents of a remote area of Dhubri, a district in Assam, travel on boats to reach their houses. The flooded areas through which the boats traverse are paddy fields | Yimkumla Longkumer | ThePrint
Text Size:

Dhubri: Lakhs of migrants were left in the lurch, with no jobs or incomes when lockdown was imposed end of March with a just a few hours of warning.

Since then, more than 2.85 lakh people, significantly migrant workers, returned to Assam from across India until 27 June, and this figure does not include those returning from other northeastern states.

During this time, more tragedy struck the state when heavy rains flooded the region, inundating crop lands. Families of several of these migrants now live in makeshift tin houses in the floodplains around the Brahmaputra river, known as char areas.

They struggle to make ends meet as their farmlands keep getting submerged and they have to keep moving from one char to another.

ThePrint’s Angana Chakrabarti and Yimkumla Longkumer travelled to a remote area of the district of Dhubri to meet the families of some of these migrant workers.

With the Brahmaputra river flowing through it, Assam has long dealt with the problem of floods. In 2019, floods affected 52,59,142 people across 30 districts, and 1,63,962.02 hectares of crop area were also damaged as a result | Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
With the Brahmaputra river flowing through it, Assam has long dealt with the problem of floods. In 2019, floods affected over 52.59 lakh people across 30 districts and 1.63 lakh hectares of crop area | Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Thousands of families in Assam live in makeshift tin houses and are constantly forced to move because of floods. Around 4,000 such chawls exist in the state | Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Thousands of families in Assam live in makeshift tin houses and are constantly forced to move because of the floods. Around 4,000 such chawls exist in the state | Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
The family of a migrant worker that lives in a tin house in a remote part of Assam's Dhubri district known as Nayeralga Part II. The only way to access their house is by a 40-minute boat ride from the nearby town of Bilasipara | Yimkumla Longkumer
The family of a migrant worker that lives in a tin house in a remote part of Assam’s Dhubri district known as Nayeralga Part II. The only way to access their house is by a 40-minute boat ride from the nearby town of Bilasipara | Yimkumla Longkumer | ThePrint
Nayer Alga Part II, a remote area of Assam's Dhubri district, remains flooded for most of the year due to massive erosion caused by the Brahmaputra river. Residents here are forced to travel by boat to access work | Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Nayer Alga Part II, a remote area of Assam’s Dhubri district, remains flooded for most of the year due to massive erosion caused by the Brahmaputra river. Residents here are forced to travel by boat to access work | Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Farmers in Assam's Dhubri district have to wade through waters to save their paddy crops during the flood season | Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Farmers in Assam’s Dhubri district have to wade through waters to save their paddy crops during the flood season | Angana Chakrabarti | ThePrint
Residents of the char areas use long wooden boats to go to and from their houses. | Yimkumla Longkumer | ThePrint
Residents of the char areas use long wooden boats to go to and from their houses | Yimkumla Longkumer | ThePrint

Subscribe to our channels on YouTube & Telegram

News media is in a crisis & only you can fix it

You are reading this because you value good, intelligent and objective journalism. We thank you for your time and your trust.

You also know that the news media is facing an unprecedented crisis. It is likely that you are also hearing of the brutal layoffs and pay-cuts hitting the industry. There are many reasons why the media’s economics is broken. But a big one is that good people are not yet paying enough for good journalism.

We have a newsroom filled with talented young reporters. We also have the country’s most robust editing and fact-checking team, finest news photographers and video professionals. We are building India’s most ambitious and energetic news platform. And we aren’t even three yet.

At ThePrint, we invest in quality journalists. We pay them fairly and on time even in this difficult period. As you may have noticed, we do not flinch from spending whatever it takes to make sure our reporters reach where the story is. Our stellar coronavirus coverage is a good example. You can check some of it here.

This comes with a sizable cost. For us to continue bringing quality journalism, we need readers like you to pay for it. Because the advertising market is broken too.

If you think we deserve your support, do join us in this endeavour to strengthen fair, free, courageous, and questioning journalism, please click on the link below. Your support will define our journalism, and ThePrint’s future. It will take just a few seconds of your time.

Support Our Journalism

Share Your Views

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here