Gaza protester holding a Palestinian flag | Twitter
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Pipe bombs sent to Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama and CNN office as Catholic church launches Pokemon-inspired game.

A 20-year-old protester in an iconic image

The photograph of a shirtless Gaza protester holding a Palestinian flag on one hand and swinging a slingshot over his head has gone viral, Al Jazeera reports.

The image of 20-year-old Palestinian A’ed Abu Amro is being compared to that of iconic French Revolution painting, Liberty Leading the People.

Mustafa Hassouna of Turkey’s Anadolu Agency clicked the photograph in which Abu Amro seems to be rising out of the thick of a protest against Israel’s blockade of Gaza.
The image is reported to have been tweeted more than 5,000 times.

Abu Amro, who lives in the al-Zaytoun neighbourhood in Gaza City, protests every Friday and Monday. He said he received the image from his friends after they spotted it circulating on social media, Al Jazeera reported.

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Speaking to Al Jazeera, Abu Amro said, “If I get killed, I want to be wrapped in the same flag. We are demanding our right of return, and protesting for our dignity and the dignity of our future generation.”

Saudi crown prince and Trump not on the same page over Khashoggi murder

Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman Wednesday made his first public comment on journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s murder, CNN reported.

Speaking at an investors’ conference in Riyadh, Prince Salman described Khashoggi’s killing as a “heinous” crime and added that those responsible would be brought to justice.

“This was a very, very painful incident for all Saudis and also for everybody on this planet. It was unnecessary,” he was quoted as saying by CNN.

Meanwhile, US President Donald Trump said Saudi Arabia’s response to Khashoggi’s murder was the “worst cover-up in history,” BBC reported.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has described the dissident journalist’s killing as a “political murder” and added that Saudi Arabia had planned it in advance.

While several conflicting claims and evidence have surfaced in the case of Khashoggi’s murder, none have been able to provide concrete proof to establish a direct involvement of a single party in the case.

Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and CNN office receive bomb parcels 

Pipe bombs were sent to the residences of several leading Democrats, including former US State Secretary Hillary Clinton and former president Barack Obama, the New York Times reported. One bomb was also sent to the CNN office at the Time Warner Centre in Manhattan that led to there evacuation of the entire building, the report added.

Across states, authorities have discovered crudely built devices contained in Manila envelopes. None of the devices harmed anyone.

On Monday, similar devices were reported to have been retrieved from the billionaire philanthropist and liberal donor George Soros’ residence.

Speaking at the White House Wednesday, Donald Trump described the attempted attacks as “despicable acts” and suggested that the nation must unify.

Clinton, Obama, Soros and CNN have figured in right-wing political attacks — many led by Trump who has often referred to major news organisations as “the enemy of the people” and has shown contempt for CNN, NYT added.

The incident comes in the wake of the upcoming mid-term elections in the country hinting towards violent political discourses, NYT said.

The Catholic Church makes a game app for “catching” saints

Inspired by ‘Pokemon Go’, the Catholic Church has launched a ‘Follow JC Go’ game app, which helps users find saints or biblical characters instead of Pikachu monsters, reports BBC.
The app was developed and launched by the Fundación Ramón Pané, a Catholic evangelical group, which made it in preparation for the World Youth Day, 2019, a church-funded event.

In the game, players move forward by answering religious questions when they meet a saint.

Singer Tracy Chapman sues rapper Nicki Minaj over the song ‘Sorry’

American folk singer Tracy Chapman has filed a copyright infringement suit against rapper Nicki Minaj relating to the song ‘Sorry’, reports CNN.

Chapman has accused Minaj of incorporating lyrics and the melody from her old song Baby, Can I Hold You into Sorry.

According to the suit, Chapman claims that Minaj and her representatives began seeking permission from June 2018 but Chapmen had denied the requests.

Though Minaj dropped Sorry from her album Queen, she, however, had provided a copy of the song to a popular New York DJ at HOT 97, a hip-hop radio station. Chapman says that the DJ later promoted the song’s release.

So far, Minaj has not responded to the suit.

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