Michelle Obama
Michelle Obama's memoir 'Becoming'| @MichelleObama/ Twitter
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New Delhi: Michelle Obama’s bestselling memoir Becoming will air as a documentary on Netflix Wednesday (6 May).

Produced by Barack and Michelle Obama’s company, Higher Ground Productions, the new documentary collates behind-the scenes footage of Michelle during her book tour in 2018-19. The documentary is directed by Nadia Hallgren.

In the trailer of the Netflix film, Michelle is seen speaking to a group of young girls and talking about her struggles as a black woman. “How did you persevere as a black woman?” a young girl is seen asking her.

The documentary captures her journey from being Michelle Robinson, the “girl who grew up in the South Side of Chicago”, to becoming Michelle Obama, the first lady of the US.

She took to both Instagram and Twitter to announce the release of the documentary.

“Those months I spent traveling—meeting and connecting with people in cities across the globe—drove home the idea that what we share in common is deep and real and can’t be messed with,” she wrote on Instagram earlier.

“In groups large and small, young and old, unique and united, we came together and shared stories, filling those spaces with our joys, worries, and dreams. We processed the past and imagined a better future. In talking about the idea of ‘becoming,’ many of us dared to say our hopes out loud.”

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I’m excited to let you know that on May 6, @Netflix will release BECOMING, a documentary film directed by @nadiahallgren that looks at my life and the experiences I had while touring following the release of my memoir. Those months I spent traveling—meeting and connecting with people in cities across the globe—drove home the idea that what we share in common is deep and real and can’t be messed with. In groups large and small, young and old, unique and united, we came together and shared stories, filling those spaces with our joys, worries, and dreams. We processed the past and imagined a better future. In talking about the idea of ‘becoming,’ many of us dared to say our hopes out loud. I treasure the memories and that sense of connection now more than ever, as we struggle together to weather this pandemic, as we care for our loved ones, and cope with loss, confusion, and uncertainty. It’s hard these days to feel grounded or hopeful, but I hope that like me, you’ll find joy and a bit of respite in what Nadia has made. Because she’s a rare talent, someone whose intelligence and compassion for others comes through in every frame she shoots. Most importantly, she understands the meaning of community, the power of community, and her work is magically able to depict it. As many of you know, I’m a hugger. My whole life, I’ve seen it as the most natural and equalizing gesture one human can make toward another—the easiest way of saying, “I’m here for you.” And this is one of the toughest parts of our new reality: Things that once felt simple—going to see a friend, sitting with someone who is hurting, embracing someone new—are now not simple at all. But I’m here for you. And I know you are here for one another. Even as we can no longer safely gather we need to stay open and able to put ourselves in other people’s shoes. Empathy is our lifeline here. Let’s use it to redirect our attention toward what matters most, and find ways to better remake the world in the image of our hopes. Even in hard times, our stories help cement our values and strengthen our connections. Sharing them shows us the way forward. I love and miss you all. #IAmBecoming.

A post shared by Michelle Obama (@michelleobama) on

 


Also read: Former US first lady Michelle Obama is the most admired American woman


The book

In November 2018, two years after the Obamas exited the White House, Michelle released her memoir Becoming. The book is divided into three parts — Becoming Me, Becoming Us, and Becoming More.

Taking readers through a journey of her life, Michelle narrates how it was to grow up in Chicago, her struggles getting into Princeton University and then Harvard Law School, meeting Barack, losing her father to multiple sclerosis and raising her daughters in the White House.

In the book, Michelle also speaks about current US President Donald Trump and says she could “never forgive” him for putting her “family’s safety at risk” over his comments that Barack was not born in the US and therefore not a legitimate president.

The memoir sold 1.4 million copies in its first week and broke records after becoming the bestselling book of 2018, just 15 days after its release. The book has also been converted into an audio book and won a Grammy award for Best Spoken Word Album .


Also read: Obama bursts back on the scene with endorsement of Joe Biden


 

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