Representational image| A sticker of the healthcare services in Stockholm to instruct people to follow the 2 meters rule during Covid crisis | Jonathan Nackstrand | Getty Images via Bloomberg
Representational image| A sticker of the healthcare services in Stockholm to instruct people to follow the 2 meters rule during Covid crisis | Jonathan Nackstrand | Getty Images via Bloomberg
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Stockholm: Sweden’s top epidemiologist has admitted his strategy to fight Covid-19 resulted in too many deaths, after persuading his country to avoid a strict lockdown.

“If we were to encounter the same illness with the same knowledge that we have today, I think our response would land somewhere in between what Sweden did and what the rest of the world has done,” Anders Tegnell said in an interview with Swedish Radio.

Tegnell is the brains behind Sweden’s controversial approach to fighting the virus, and the government of Stefan Lofven has deferred to the epidemiologist in its official response to the pandemic. Gatherings of more than 50 people continue to be banned, but throughout the crisis Swedes have been able to visit restaurants, go shopping, attend gyms and send children under 16 to school.

The laxer approach to containing the virus has drawn both praise and indignation from across the globe. What is beyond debate, however, is the effect the strategy has had on the country’s death toll.

At 43 deaths per 100,000, Sweden’s death rate is among the highest globally and far exceeds that of neighboring Denmark and Norway, which imposed much tougher lockdowns at the outset of the pandemic.

Now, Tegnell has for the first time admitted publicly that the strategy is resulting in too many deaths.

“Clearly, there is potential for improvement in what we have done in Sweden,” he said.

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Falling Behind

Until now, Tegnell had argued that the long-term nature of the Covid-19 pandemic required a more sustainable response than severe and sudden lockdowns. Despite criticism from abroad, Tegnell’s strategy enjoyed widespread support in Sweden.

But with many other European Union countries now rolling back their lockdowns after appearing to bring Covid-19 under control, there are signs that Sweden may be left behind. That includes the freedom of movement of its citizens, as some EU countries restrict access to people coming from what are deemed high-risk Covid zones.

What’s more, there’s so far limited evidence that Sweden’s decision to leave much of its society open will support the economy. Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson recently warned that Sweden is facing its worst economic crisis since World War II, with GDP set to slump 7% in 2020, roughly as much as the rest of the EU.

The government has started to grow concerned at the apparent missteps taken to fight the spread of the virus in Sweden. On Monday, Lofven promised there’d be an inquiry into the handling of the crisis before the summer.

Some lawmakers in Sweden’s parliament were quick to weigh in. Jimmie Akesson, the leader of the anti-immigration Sweden Democrats, tweeted that the comments by Tegnell are “astonishing.”

“For months, critics have been consistently dismissed. Sweden has done everything right, the rest of the world has done it wrong. And now, suddenly, this,” Akesson said. – Bloomberg


Also read: US warns researchers against Chinese hackers, price of Swedish model & other global Covid news


 

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3 Comments Share Your Views

3 COMMENTS

  1. The “experiments” and hoopla about “herd immunity” carried out initially in the UK and in Sweden to a full extent is an eye opener . You cannot “assume” immunity when a new virus strikes even with lots of similarities to the family of other coronaviruses. It also shows that strict lockdown does help in reducing infection rates and protecting vulnerable from early deaths thereby reducing anticipated high death rates too.

  2. Such is the confusion world wide. Brazil delayed lockdoennand suffering and SG want to put entire blame on Modi.On Delhi riots what about Ankit sharma? Had he killed himself? No Muslim not Tahir is innocent. This is modern time they are aplenty videos , online transactions and Mobile data to catch culprits thanks to lack of physical cash and on line coumpuldory online transactions many ‘ll be caught nakedly. On China also being an Indian how article that much derogatory to army(fingers under boots) allowed to print being Indian, the print.

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