Tuesday, 9 August, 2022
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Delhi HC asks Centre why it shouldn’t face contempt for failing to supply oxygen to Delhi

The two-judge bench rejected the Centre's submission that Delhi was not entitled to 700 metric tonnes of medical oxygen in light of existing medical infrastructure.

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New Delhi: The Delhi High Court Tuesday directed the Centre to show cause as to why contempt not be initiated against it for failing to comply with order on supply of oxygen to Delhi for treating COVID-19 patients.

You can put your head in sand like an ostrich, we will not the high court said. “Are you living in ivory towers?”

A bench of Justices Vipin Sanghi and Rekha Palli also rejected the Centre’s submission that Delhi was not entitled to 700 metric tonnes of medical oxygen in light of existing medical infrastructure.

“We see grim reality everyday of people not able to secure oxygen or ICU beds in hospitals which have reduced beds due to gas shortage, it said.

The high court directed two senior central government officers to be present before it on Wednesday to respond to the notice.

It said the Supreme Court’s April 30 detailed order shows direction to the central government to provide 700 MT of oxygen per day to Delhi, not just 490 MT.

It further said that the Supreme Court has already directed and now the high court is also saying that the Centre will have to supply 700 MT oxygen daily to Delhi right away by whatever means.


Also read: Oxygen tankers ‘held hostage’ at Haryana plant, taking 6x longer to fill, Delhi claims


 

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