The Gateway of India, a popular tourist attraction lies deserted. Pigeons are the only visitors this monument has seen since the lockdown | Photo: Soniya Agarwal | ThePrint
The Gateway of India, a popular tourist attraction, lies deserted. Pigeons are the only visitors this monument has seen since the lockdown | Soniya Agarwal | ThePrint
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Mumbai: In the fourth phase of lockdown, Mumbai’s usually crowded areas continued to be deserted.

The state of Maharashtra, with more than 37,000 cases of Covid-19, has the highest number in the country, with the densely populated Mumbai accounting for more than 22,000.

ThePrint’s Soniya Agarwal and Swagata Yadavar, who have been travelling across the western coast of the country, visited a few of the city’s iconic landmarks to give you a glimpse of how they look during the lockdown.

Flora fountain and Hutatma chowk usually surrounded by thick traffic and students buying books on the pavement nearby lies deserted | Photo: Swagata Yadavar | ThePrint
Flora Fountain and Hutatma Chowk are usually surrounded by dense traffic and students buying books on the pavement nearby | Swagata Yadavar | ThePrint
The popular restaurant Pizza by the Bay at Marive Drive has a cheeky take on the coronavirus | Photo: Soniya Agarwal | ThePrint
Pizza by the Bay, a popular restaurant on Marine Drive, has a cheeky take on the coronavirus | Soniya Agarwal | ThePrint
A man walks by on the Cumbaala Hill with the Mumbai skyline and the Haji Ali mosque in the background | Photo: Swagata Yadavar | ThePrint
A man walks in the Cumballa Hill area, with the city’s famous Haji Ali dargah and mosque in the background | Swagata Yadavar | ThePrint
The Haji Ali Dargah, another tourist attraction lies deserted during the month of Ramzan | Photo: Soniya Agarwal | ThePrint
Haji Ali dargah, usually packed with devotees, lies deserted during the month of Ramzan | Soniya Agarwal | ThePrint
Even though fishing activities have been exempted from lockdoen. Only 30 percent fishing has taken place. With shrinking market the fishing community in Mumbai has been suffering | Photo: Soniya Agarwal | ThePrint
Even though fishing activities have been exempted from lockdown, only 30 per cent of regular fishing activity has taken place. | Soniya Agarwal | ThePrint
Marine drive, the queens necklace, looks sombre without tourists and residents sitting and enjoying the evening breeze | Photo: Soniya Agarwal | ThePrint
Marine Drive looks sombre without tourists and residents sitting by the sea and enjoying the evening breeze | Soniya Agarwal | ThePrint
The Mumbai skyline in its full glory | Photo: Soniya Agarrwal | ThePrint
Deserted stretches of the coast | Soniya Agarwal | ThePrint

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