Brick kiln workers at a site in Rangareddy district | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
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Rangareddy: Even as Telangana’s capital Hyderabad has begun easing lockdown restrictions amid the spread of coronavirus infections, the migrant crisis is far from over in this southern state.

The once thriving brick kilns spread across 11 districts in Telangana today wear a deserted look.

While a couple of worker families can still be seen in Rangareddy and a few other districts of the state, many brick kiln labourers are stranded on highways, in their homes and outside the Secunderabad railway station. Around 90 per cent of these workers who hail from Odisha said they will never come back to Telangana.

ThePrint’s Suraj Singh Bisht captures the plight of these migrant workers.

A worker lays bricks in Rangareddy district of Telangana | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
A brick kiln worker from Odisha lives with his family in a shack near Kongara Kalan village in Rangareddy district | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Another family from Odisha at Kongara Kalan village | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Children belonging to brick kiln workers from Odisha at Kongara Kalan village | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Laborers at brick kilns in Kongara Kalan village | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
A woman paints her nails before starting on her journey home to Odisha | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
A worker serves food to her children outside the Secunderabad railway station | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Children of workers outside Secunderabad railway station | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint

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