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New Delhi: The Indian Pharmaceutical Alliance, a lobby group for drug manufacturers, Wednesday released the details of the meeting Prime Minister Narendra Modi had convened with the industry on 1 January.

ThePrint had reported on 13 January, citing official sources, that PM Modi had asked the top executives to “follow ethical marketing practices” and not bribe doctors with various gifts.

The press statement issued by the IPA denied that PM Modi had warned pharma companies “not to bribe doctors” and to “use ethical marketing practices”. ThePrint stands by its report.


Also read: Leave phones outside doctor’s chamber: IMA branch after PM’s bribe warning to pharma firms


IPA statement

The IPA said the meeting was attended by top names in the pharma industry, including Pankaj Patel of Cadila Healthcare, Dilip Shanghvi of Sun Pharma, Habil Khorakiwala of Wockhardt, Rajiv Modi of Cadila Pharma and Sudhir Mehta of Torrent.

“The meeting was called to discuss future roadmap for growth of the healthcare industry. The focus of discussion was on: Research and development, building innovation ecosystem, improving access to high quality medicine, and strengthening global competitiveness of the industry,” said a press statement issued by the IPA.

It added that “there was no discussion on Uniform Code for Pharmaceutical Marketing Practice in the meeting”.


Also read: ‘Prove or apologise’ — IMA writes to PM Modi on pharma firms bribing doctors with women


IPA had denied having any info about meeting

ThePrint had approached IPA secretary-general Sudarshan Jain on 10 January through a phone call for comment on the meeting with the PM. Jain had denied having any information.

Sources had told ThePrint that Modi intervened after the Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilisers’ Department of Pharmaceuticals warned drug-makers on 23 December that it would bring in statutory provisions for pharma marketing. The meeting was chaired by DoP secretary P.D. Vaghela, and attended by all pharmaceutical associations in India, including the IPA.


Also read: Leave phones outside doctor’s chamber: IMA branch after PM’s bribe warning to pharma firms


 

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4 Comments Share Your Views

4 COMMENTS

  1. It is the pharma people who should be condemned. They are the ones who are the brain behind all these illegal activities, and spoil the reputation of the doctors .

  2. The report by The Print, covered by the same journalist clearly talks of a Source in the Government, who had attended the said meeting. In the report on 13th January, the said source was quoted, without being name.
    In view of the statement issues by IPA on 15th January, it is necessary to have more clarity on the entire issue.
    The Print, now the onus lies with you to prove that what you had reported was true or frivolous. This report has made scathing observations thus impacting the image of an entire fraternity of professionals and it is mandated that truth about the incident and also ethical journalism must prevail.
    A prompt reply will be in order as well as naming the cited Government source quoted in the report and been there in the meeting.

  3. The Print seems anti BJP/Modi and first accusing government and then publishes opposite.
    Does media has responsibility to verify first then inform public?

  4. There is something fishy in this entire episode, which makes me uncomfortable.

    1. Why was Indian Medical Association so quick in responding to the Hon. Prime Ministers call?

    2. Why did the IMA offiials appear so panicky?

    3. The IPA press statement is ambiguous. The last line of the press statement says there was no such discussion (which means two or more people are involved!

    Whereas ThePrint statement talks about a unilateral statement/ a sort of warning from the Prime Minister against unfair marketing practices.

    Perhaps some deep investigation from ThePrint must be initiated.

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