scorecardresearch
Saturday, April 1, 2023
HomeGo To PakistanPakistani students take a dig at LUMS university with 'missing persons' notice...

Pakistani students take a dig at LUMS university with ‘missing persons’ notice in Lahore

Students at Lahore University of Management Sciences have called for changes at their university following the expulsion of a student in his final year for providing tuitions.

Text Size:

New Delhi: Pakistani students at Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS) have been distributing a tongue-in-cheek ‘missing persons’ flyer calling for changes at their university. The university is no stranger to controversy for its policies, salaries and actions.

Titled, “PLEASE HELP FIND! MISSING”, the white and blue flyer names the missing person as LUMS and its “mental condition” being that “it recently started acting like an army brat”.

The flyer further details that the Lahore institution was once a safe space for religious and sexual minorities, a supportive environment for free thought against moral policing, exploitation of university staff as well as an institution that was transparent in its operations.

The flyer continues to be circulated on social media along with the hashtag #InvestigateLUMS, with some users noting that the institution “is really not the LUMS everyone expected it to be”.

The emergence of the flyer comes nearly two weeks after students at the university called for an investigation into the administration’s policies following the expulsion of a student in his final year for providing tuitions.


Also read: A WhatsApp post can get you death in Pakistan. It’s blasphemy of course


No tuitions

According to a report by Pakistani daily The Friday Times, the administration alleged that the student had been helping others cheat through organised tuition lessons and sharing of notes.

“We strongly condemn the expulsion of another student from LUMS as a disciplinary action in Disciplinary Committee hearing.LUMS is expelling the students without any valid reason & it is highly condemnable. We request the higher authorities to investigate the case. #investigateLUMS,” wrote one user on 12 January.

Meanwhile, other students argued that providing tuition is a go-to for many who come from low-middle income families.

“I taught my way, O/A Level students, through my bachelor’s degree at IBA,” wrote another user.

‘Disparity’ between V-C and janitor salary

Last month, the university came under fire after it announced students would be charged PKR 18,000 to attend their convocation ceremony. A student pointed out that it was the same amount janitors were paid for the whole month.

The uproar emerged as LUMS and other elite universities came under scrutiny for their high fees despite the pandemic and debilitating economic crisis in Pakistan, which have left many families in the country struggling.

To add to the controversy, LUMS has long been criticised for low wages paid to cleaning and services staff. Last month, the controversy reared its head again after Farooq Tariq, General Secretary Pakistan Kissan Rabita Committee (PKRC), made claims about the disparity between the salaries of the vice-chancellor and the janitors.

The issue had also cropped up in 2019 when LUMS students protested along with janitorial staff who wanted to be paid their salaries ahead of the Easter Holiday. After the incident, the staff received their salaries.

Similar protests took place in 2012, when a group of LUMS students, with help from a few instructors, demanded the re-hiring of 16 members of the janitorial staff. The incident unfolded after the university’s entire janitorial staff of 101 people protested for an increase in their minimum wages. After it was announced that wages would be increased, however, 16 janitors were fired.

(Edited by Neera Majumdar)

Subscribe to our channels on YouTube & Telegram

Support Our Journalism

India needs fair, non-hyphenated and questioning journalism, packed with on-ground reporting. ThePrint – with exceptional reporters, columnists and editors – is doing just that.

Sustaining this needs support from wonderful readers like you.

Whether you live in India or overseas, you can take a paid subscription by clicking here.

Support Our Journalism

Most Popular