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HomeANI Press ReleasesResolving Human/Animal (Pet) Conflict in the twenty-first century

Resolving Human/Animal (Pet) Conflict in the twenty-first century

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People for Animals

New Delhi (India), November 16 (ANI/PNN): Animal cruelty is tremendously dangerous to human civilization.

Those who are cruel to animals are frequently cruel to humans as well. For offenses ranging from domestic abuse to cheating to horrendous assault, a statistically significant percentage of people end up in prison.

As a result, anyone in your neighbourhood who is aggressive against animals or who promotes violence and breaching the law through social media platforms such as WhatsApp should be kept on the lookout. The number and diversity of cruel and criminal acts perpetrated against animals have increased dramatically.

This has risen significantly during the COVID era when people fearful for their futures and irritated at being confined for so long turned their rage on animals and animal feeders. Poisoning, stoning, pursuing, running over, relocating street animals, and harassing, beating, and intimidating animal workers all became commonplace.

Some RWAs make it a rule that pets are not allowed on the premises. Some excellent residents for animal feeding. Some pet owners are charged extra maintenance fees. Some people designate areas where animals are not permitted. Some guards are given orders to hit community animals. Animals are prohibited in some elevators.

The following is a quick reference guide for pet owners and RWAs on the ground laws:

No RWA has the authority to prohibit people from having animals. This is supported by two High Court decisions as well as society registrars.

RWAs are unable to impose penalties on people who maintain dogs.

No RWA has the authority to prohibit pets from using lifts, but, if questioned, owners can use alternate operating lifts if they are conveniently accessible and comfortable.

No RWA has the authority to ask a resident to give up their pet.

There may be times when a pet owner’s dog barks, which may be irritating to the neighbours. According to the standards, noise is a form of expression that must be tolerated. However, pet parents are encouraged to assist as much as possible in the circumstances to prevent causing difficulty to their neighbours.

RWA resolutions that may harm animals violate Section 11 (3) of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animal Act, 1960. It is also against Article 51 A (g) of the Constitution, which provides for protection and improvement of the natural environment, including forests, lakes, rivers, and wildlife, and to have compassion for living creatures. However, maintaining the peace and beauty of your housing society is your responsibility, too.

Pet owners should talk to their RWAs on how to dispose of pet faeces and other waste. The RWA can also designate pet corners and spaces for this purpose. It is also stated that pet owners, carers, and dog walkers must ensure that if their pet defecates in public places, the owner is responsible for keeping the area clean.

The guidelines state, “It is underlined that each residential community and complex must determine which way works best for them, and solutions cannot be imposed on anyone.” Pets must be vaccinated regularly, and sterilization is recommended to prevent unlawful breeding.

Consider your dog to be a child that expects his loving parents to provide him love, support, protection, and respect. By ignoring his pleas to play, walk, or leave him behind, you will never be able to resist your canine’s need for support and love. Keep in mind that you have family, friends, a career, and a pastime, whereas your dog has no one except you, and you are his top priority.

Visit: https://www.peopleforanimalsbangalore.org/

This story is provided by PNN. ANI will not be responsible in any way for the content of this article. (ANI/PNN)

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